Corporeal abstractions (Microportrait)

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2019-2020

vacuum formed plexi-glass
Series (6): Tooth, Eyelash, Skin, Hair, Tooth v.2, Nail
Dim. 80 x 90 cm (each)

This series of relief light-sensitive works was conceived on the basis of computer-modified microscopic images of particles of the artist’s body by inverse digital transformation (IFFT), with the help of computer programmes used in microscopy. This is why the fragments of micro structures, despite the seeming naturalism indicated by the titles of particular works, are not the magnification of ‘the natural’, but algorithmically coded images, an artificial product of the ‘mechanical’, digital. Transparent or reflecting surfaces are dynamized by light effects and the fluctuating, subjective perception of the observer in time and space.

Handkerchief

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2019

3D print, plywood
dim: 70 x 100 cm

Likeness (Urs Bold)

2019

neon light, plexiglass, paper
dim: 180 x 40 x 10 cm

Polymorphics

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2018

Vacuum formed polyester
Series of 4 works; diim (each): 80 x 80 cm

Four wall reliefs are based on the same microscopic image of carbon substance, which is being transformed by the use of special computer programs used in microscopy. The proceeding of image projection in the realm of inverse (multidimensional space) and filtered back into two or three dimensional form by filters’ data extraction produces four variations of the same. Such alteration of the same motif expresses the idea that the polymorphic nature (variabilty) of the visibile is produced only by subjective perception filters that are altering rather invisible same complex reality.

Reciprocity

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2017

diptych: laser-cut and digital print on plexiglass,
dim: 200 x 135 cm

The hanging objects present microscopic images of a carbon substance and its digital mapping (transcription) into a reciprocal space. Perforation of the transparent carrier-surface and the accompanying shadow cause the object to become dematerialized and the transition of the material into an immaterial state in space.

Polymorphic imprint

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2017

installation composed of 4 reliefs (CNC sculpture) and 4 photographs (digital print on acrylic support)
dim: reliefs (each): 80 x 80 cm; photographs: 60 x 60 cm

The crystal structures are microscopically analyzed using computer programs, which allow the simulation of mapped image projections into the inverse (reciprocal) space. The manipulation or reduction of data using filters in the domain of inverse space – which is considerably more complex than real space – and the subsequent projection of the motif (based on the partial information) back into the real space generates a transformed version (copy) of the original image. As a result of this mapping the motif is still recognizable; however, the original form has been changed.

Ground reliefs are based on and developed through such mappings and modifications of the image, which was created during the process of microscopic observation of the carbon substances (see the work Reciprocity). The three-dimensional imprints of images, which were created by diffraction in the inverse space (the filters used in this procedure are illustrated by the graphics on the wall), express the similarity embodied in diversity (dissimilar similarity) and from this perspective represent polymorphic imprints of this particular sameness.

The procedure involved in digital mapping and spatial projections, which shape the transformations of the same motif, metaphorically address questions of perception and the selective operations of the psychological structures (perception filters) that define them. These serve to express the idea that our reality is a complex imprint of reciprocal (multidimensional) space, while the polymorphic shape of the visible is created out of the subjective nature and conditions of perception.

Observatory: carbon nanotubes

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2016

sound-kinetic diorama
exterior: acrylic object in crystalloid like form;
interior: relief, turntable, light, sound
sound: Scanner - Robin Rimbaud
dim: 115 x 72 x 70 cm

The kinetic diorama submerged within and enhanced by the audio environment observed through an opening in the surface of a crystal-shaped object imitates the structural makeup of carbon nanotubes visible through a microscope. A hub of tubes creates a nano-topographic simulation, whose technical attributes reveal another specific characteristic uncovered within the domain of light technology: carbon nanotubes, which represent a compelling potential, since they allow, indeed facilitate the transformation of electrical energy into light with virtually no heat loss.

Observatory: magnetic fluid

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2014-2016

sound-kinetic diorama
exterior: acrylic object in crystalloid like form;
interior: relief (three-dimensional cast), turntable, light, sound
sound: Scanner - Robin Rimbaud
dim: 110 x 60 x 60 cm
Photo by: Damjan Švarc

A miniature silver landscape in motion that can be viewed through the observation perforation in the surface of a cristal-like object is based on the photographs of magnetic fluids that served as the basis for digital model development and the resulting 3D printed reliefs. In the act of viewing the framed panorama in the static position, the viewer loses a sense of scale; the tiny spiked structures of the kinetic surface take on the appearance of the surface topography of some distant planet. Dematerialized by its own reflections, the artificial landscape blurs the distinction between the real and the virtual. Simulacra of the natural metaphorically mediate the idea of nature as a projection, one that mirrors our own projections and perceptions.

Ferrocrystals

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2014

laser-cut and digital print on plexiglass,
variable dimensions
Exhibition views at UGM, Maribor (2016) and Today Art Museum, Beijing (2016)
Photo by: Damjan Švarc

Photosensitive images are based on microscopic images of the nanoparticles of a magnetic fluid's crystallized structure. Digitally processed and laser-treated images of organic patterns reveal the invisible arrangements at nano-scale dimensions. At the same time the material reproductions on the glass create dematerialized sensory bodies whose projections transform our perception of space. The installation implies a moving viewer, as the surface textures vary with the viewing angle.

Luminescence

2012

light-kinetic installation; turntable, silver plating plexiglass dim. 70 x 90 cm, light reflections variable dimensions sound: Scanner - Robin Rimbaud

Anatomical Transfigurations

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2012

X-ray films, four-part series
dim: no. 1: 155 x 116 cm, no. 2: 155 x 124 cm, no. 3: 145 x 124 cm, no. 4: 145 x 116 cm

Anatomical Transfigurations explores the effects of medical visualizations and mediation of the internal body upon the altered perception and valuation of the body today. In a broader perspective it questions the dichotomy between physical and mental, eternal and transitory, thus exploring and expanding the traditional theme of vanitas. The transfiguration of anatomical fragments as recorded by conventional x-ray techniques into new visual representations effects a re-contextualization of scientific medical imagery into the field of art.

Self-portrait – Camera Oralis

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2012

digital print on plexiglass
Variable dimensions
Collaboration: Uroš Abram

This series of photographs was produced using a particular form of camera obscura created by the artist's mouth. Technically the images are based on the use of a small piece of photosensitive paper installed in the mouth with the aperture located between the lips: the projection of light 'draws' an outline of the body observed and the exterior body is displaced in its own interior. However, the shape of the body, resulting in such an analogous process as an imprint of light, is not the only element determining the image; it occurs via a mixture of other types of imprints produced by the body itself - fingers, saliva, tongue, teeth, etc. The resulting 'visceral' self-portrait is permeated by corporeality and does not singularly 'represent' the bodily.

Fractal

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2012

mirror - glass (dim: 120 x 80 cm), light projection and reflection

The light work Fractal is part of a series of works dealing with the idea of the 'transparent body'. Formally the work is based on a radiological image of the brain, the use of light sensitive materials and the integration of non-material phenomena such as light projections and reflections. The diffracted image shows the branching of blood vessels and also, because of the vertical installment, resembles the structure of the pulmonary bronchi. The fractal structure of the corporal organ maps the invisible geometry of the body, while the light dematerializing the image suggests the impermanent and fragile essence of the physical, whether organic or artificial.

Lumina (Luminous)

2008

plexiglass, reflective foil, resin, light reflection
variable dimensions

Levitation

2007

plexiglass, reflective foil, resin, light reflection
variable dimensions

Lumina

2007

plexiglass (200 x 140 cm), resin, light reflection, light projection
variable dimensions

'Uršula Berlot’s work develops out of the evanescence of perception, predominantly delving into the realm of optics. Reflections and shadows produce enchanting images, which often dispel their mundane origin. In Lumina, a sheet of Plexiglas dotted with resin casts a projection, which comes alive and magnifies in scale when lit, thereby engulfing whatever fills in its way. Devoid of texture, Berlot’s are quintessential impressions that confound the boundary between perception and illusion: they exist only as waves of different frequency-lengths bouncing off surfaces and then hitting the retina. Yet they imbue the spectator with emotions provoked by chiaroscuro - semantically evocative of life extremes - and by patterns reminiscent of the natural effects produced by liquids and gases when condensing or evaporating, and of fractals. The designs are uniquely shaped by light and appear only in obscurity, vice versa, areas of shadow are observable only in so far as they are dark leftovers from illuminated areas, i.e. as the negatives of bright contours. Moreover, they do not seem intentional, but simply edited out from nature, and only the display is manifestly staged. The delicacy and transience of the work is pernicious; we are not sure of what we see, constantly flipping between negative and mirror projections, an effect even accentuated when the installation is kinetic (obtained with a video projector or a rotating motor). Focussing on ethereal images projects the viewer into hidden dimensions, hinting at disclosures of higher discernment.' - Alessandra Pace, SCI'ART, 2009 (excerpt)

Cross-sections

2007

plexiglass, aluminium plate (100 x 150 cm), resin, light reflection, light projection
variable dimensions

Reflective Transitoriness

2006

kinetic light installation
reflective foil, artificial resin, rotating motor, lights
variable dimensions

A transparent picture is suspended on a rotating engine installed on the ceiling and is illuminated by two halogen projectors. It slowly rotates and projects moving, crystal-like light rays and veiled reflections. The fractal form on the plate is a computer-modified image of an X-ray scan of the author's brain. The reproduction is two-sided, made of two types of material – one that reflects like a mirror, and another that enlarges like a magnifying lens, thus creating a condensation of light into a crystalline projection. The kinetic, multilayered spatial structure creates a virtual picture of membranous veils of light, which in the dissolving borders between the exterior and the interior, the projected and the reflected, metaphorically speaks of transitoriness, non-determination and the multidimensional spatial/time essence of every system, the sensible (natural or artificial) as well as the intelligible.

Cerebral Landscapes (Reflection)

2006

kinetic light installation
bended plexiglas, light projection, electronic light modulator
variable dimensions

Four projectors illuminate a bent piece of plexiglass positioned horizontally on the floor that reflects a multi-layered image: an organic-like structure on the wall of a triangle-shaped space. The light is manipulated with an electronic modulator, which regulates the intensity and speed of the projection, thus giving the impression of a slow, wave-like movement of a three-dimensional porous structure. The project deals with the visualization of pulsating pre-cerebral states, mental-sensory patterns and mental energies. Cerebral Landscapes – Reflection can also be understood as an artistic metaphor of dichotomy, implied by the dual meaning of the word reflection, since it can denote the optic phenomenon of light reflection or a mental activity – a concentrated process of thinking.

Crystalline Diagram

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2006

reflective foil, plexiglass
dim: 2,5 x 0,5 m;
A fractal-like crystalline shape made of reflective foil on plexiglass creates a diffraction of light and forms an abstract color image of the light spectrum – a rainbow on the wall perpendicular to it. The composition is a computer-aided image showing an isolated brain vessel, which as part of the human blood system presents a natural fractal form.

Primal States (Lux Aeterna)

2006

site-specific installation (La Cittadele, Saint-Tropez)
plexiglass (150 x 200 cm), resin, light projection, sand

'Working with nature, Uršula Berlot sets out to discover its underlying principles, subtly intangible yet overtly percpetible. Her challenging installations heighten viewers' awareness of their own experience of time and space, undermining their certainty of being able to distinguish the living from the non-living, the material from the immaterial, the natural from the artificial. Primal States is a visual metaphor of the characteristics of the feminine. Horizontality, passivity, acceptance, frankness, sweetness and tenderness are shown in the context of a deliberately formal agenda. The use of transparent materials that reflect natural light by day and by night suggests an analogy with nature, organic forms and the fundamental concept of creation.' (from the catalogue ART’FAB: L’art-La femme-L’Europe. Saint-Tropez, Paris: Terrail, 2006)

Crystal Shade

2003

plexiglass, artificial epoxy resin, mirror
dim: 85 x 300 cm

Gradual Passage

2003

plexiglass, artificial resin
dim: 100 X 180 cm

Vaporscape

2003

plexiglass, artificial resin
dim: 180 x 100 cm

Translucent Membrane

2002

plexiglass, artificial epoxy resin, shadow, reflection
dim: 180 x 100 cm

'Uršula reintroduces indeterminacy, one of the key elements of the abstraction, through thorough setting up of art objects in the space and using of the light. The objects do not end with the contours of their material substance, they are "open works", extending themselves into the immaterial sphere with the interplay of the material and its shadow. In the ambiences that are being constructed a passage from physical matter to its untouchable presence is realised. Indirectly also a passage from three-dimensional to four-dimensional field occurrs, the latter being constituted by time based phenomenon of the light and the viewer’s perception process. In communicating with the art work, the viewer is an active part who puts his/her experience into an order and adapts the unknown to the known.' – Nataša Petrešin, 2002 (excerpt from the exhibtion text Reflection)

Translucent Membrane – Micronature

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2002

plexiglass, artificial resin
dim: 100 X 180 cm

'As well as the light-and-shade relationships between the material and the immaterial, the resulting optical images reveal, in their metamorphoses, completely different aspects of the dimensions of space and time. The artist attempts to problematise constantly changing natural processes through endless repetitions of mobile images by means of which she creates the new technological spaces of the optical field. In the dynamics of this process she attempts to go beyond the traditional dialectical relationships between material and immaterial, light and shade, change and permanency and transitoriness and eternity. In this way she places herself beyond all borders based on dualities. With her light objects, Ursula Berlot creates an illusory space which, as well as presenting experimental visual phenomena, is capable of setting more unusual perceptional challenges for the viewer in the sense of an individual understanding of time and space.’ – Alenka Spacal, Chrystal Shade, 2003 (excerpt)

Reflection

2002

bend plexiglass, reflected light
Dim: 100 x 200 x 60 cm

'An object by Uršula: a monochromatic shadowy image drawn on a white screen, on the floor or on the wall, by reflected light shining though deformed and corrugated plexiglass. This shadowy image creates the impression of the third dimension and appears to be material – a shadowy perspective created by accumulation of transparencies, reflections and shadows. The ‘image’ clearly appears as a projection, as a projection process; the object demands that we pay attention to its double structure, the relationship between the basic plexiglass transparency and the non-material light reflection. (...) The transition from the silent plexiglass matter to the organic shadowy image is discrete and not linked. There is no lever between the two, only empty space without any awareness. It is the space of the subject.' – Luka Omladič, Reflection, 2002 (excerpt)

Incubator

2002

multimedia interactive sound-light installation;
collaboration: Tao G. Vrhovec Sambolec (sound, interactive system)
technology: movement sensors, electronic interface, lights, sound, ventilators
variable dimensions

Incubator is an interactive audio-visual installation that represents a self-sustained, circularly arranged dynamic system that translates tactile signals into audio and visual events. A viewer strolling through a completely darkened space is randomly touched or bumped into drifting fans and sensors that transmit air and tactile impulses to the electronic interface. It triggers instantaneous flashes of lights that create individual projections of transparent images and sound in a way that gives a sense of the presence of phantom-like intangible entities. The title (Incubator) refers to self-referentiality and autonomy of a dynamic 'living' system, its circular organization ('autopoieses' in terms of F. Varela's definition), whose transformations are triggered by the viewer.

Nature

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2001

artificial resin, pigment;
dim: 120 x 130 cm

I’m interested in nature as a space of physical phenomena, elementary states of light and matter. My art is a metaphorical transposition of transitional, natural phenomena (transparency and other manifestations of light, fluid, organic states of physical substance, metamorphosis of forms, transition, condensation and crystallization of matter). Therefore, a transfer, translocation and stabilization of transitional natural states and ephemeral events with stable industrial, artificial materials. These are reduced: I use dematerialized bases of plexiglass and synthetic resin, in an analogy to the primary, fluid, colorless substance of the world. The procedures are based on the natural physical and chemical processes of gravity, crystallization, coagulation. The pictures are fragile sensors of light, open, passable spaces, translucent membranes, sensitive spaces of color ascetics, realms of shadows and reflections. They function on the sensual level; they are experienced as multidimensional organisms in material and non-material extensions. – Uršula Berlot, 2001